Alcohol Addiction Treatment – Which Program Is Best?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-CmyEyv2rk

Alcohol addiction treatment helps thousands of alcoholics across the United States make lasting recoveries each year. Although laypeople often still view alcoholism as a matter of willpower, clinical alcohol addiction treatment is required for long-term sobriety. Like every other addiction, alcoholism is a neurological disease.

 

 

There are three primary types of treatment plans for alcoholics – inpatient, partial hospitalization, and outpatient. They each have their advantages and disadvantages, and certain programs are better for certain life situations. Here are the details on the different programs offered for alcohol addiction treatment.

 

Inpatient Treatment

 

Inpatient rehab programs are designed to quickly produce radical lifestyle changes. They are the most effective way for severely addicted people to become sober, but they also require the most time and effort. Inpatients spend thirty to ninety days living full-time at their treatment facilities, and they receive fifty or more hours of intensive therapies per week.

 

These therapies primarily include evidence-based treatments such as individual counseling, group discussions, and family therapy. Overall, these therapies are designed to uncover the root causes of alcoholics’ addictions and teach them strategies for coping with future temptations to drink. They also help alcoholics form healthy friendships, repair old friendships, and crate positive home environments. Such long-term strategies are what make alcohol addiction treatment so effective.

 

Partial Hospitalization

 

Also called day and night programs, partial hospitalization is a transitional treatment method for alcoholics who have already undergone an inpatient stay. Recovering alcoholics are sometimes not ready to face the challenges and responsibilities of living on their own full-time, so they continue to receive therapies during daytime hours.

 

In the evenings, they are free to return home under the supervision of clinic staff. They practice clean living and prepare to make their transitions to more independent, sober lives. Although partial hospitalization is less involved than inpatient treatment, participants still receive intensive, evidence-based therapies when they attend their clinics.

 

Outpatient Treatment

 

Some alcoholics suffer only short relapses. Others may not have the time to dedicate to an inpatient program. Careers, families, and financial obligations make it impossible for some people to set aside one to three months of their lives to focus on recovery. For these alcoholics, outpatient programs are often the best choice.

 

Outpatient alcohol addiction treatment involves the same intensive therapies as other programs. However, patients are only required to visit their clinics for a few hours per day. Once they have received treatment, they are free to use the rest of their time as they see fit. Although this level of freedom may not work well for people who are still physically dependent on alcohol, outpatient treatment allows relapsed addicts the opportunity to seek help without disrupting their daily lives.

 

If you or someone you love is currently struggling with addiction, click the links below to find a treatment center near you. Alcoholism is a crippling disease, but inpatient alcohol addiction treatment can help you achieve sobriety and get your life back on the right track.

Resource

Intensive Outpatient Program | Partial Hospitalization Program  

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The Difference Between Alcoholism Treatment Centers and Recovery Programs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2c95gzo48U

Yes there is a difference between alcoholism treatment centers and a recovery program. Personally, I have been through inpatient treatment on three different occasions so these experiences are from my own point of few. Different treatment centers utilize different techniques and approaches so what I share is from my own experience. It’s also important to mention that each time was somewhat of a different experience for me, but that will be more for a later article. For now, I’m going to stick with the differences, as I see them between treatment centers and recovery programs.

 

Treatment centers

Treatment centers are facilities which provide inpatient rehab programs and/or Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOP). The purpose of these facilities is to help the alcoholic deal with the immediate emotional and physical issues which arise when stopping the consumption of alcohol. The most immediate benefit of alcoholism treatment centers is the enormous support the patients receive when being admitted. If the patient has been consuming large amounts of alcohol for an extended period of time, a detoxification process is usually necessary. Many times this is done at a separate facility, such as a detox center, better equipped and staffed to handle the serious physical and/or medical side-effects of detoxification. Although, many treatment centers have the staff and are qualified to detox the patient at the same facilities.

 

Treatment centers are where the alcoholic is introduced and educated on the aspects of the disease of alcoholism. Generally the patients attend lectures and classes throughout the day which inform them not only about the physical and medical aspect of the disease, but the great emotional aspects as well. In addition to classes and lectures, small group sessions are usually held which give the individual patients a chance to get used to the group therapy process. One-on-one counseling (between certified counselor and patient) is most commonly done either on a day-to-day basis as well or as many time as the counselors schedule allows. When researching a treatment center, it may be a good idea to inquire about the patient to counselor ration. In my experience, I was able to meet with a personal counselor at least three times a week and more if needed.

 

The length of stayed required at in-patient treatment centers varies, many times depending on insurance coverages. The most common is 28 days and can range from a few days to several years. There are also programs referred to as an IOP, or Intensive Out Patient program. These due not require in-patient accommodations and generally consists of lectures and group therapy three to four times per week.

 

There are those in recovery who have achieved long-term sobriety without entering a treatment center. A common saying heard around recovery is “treatment is a great place for discovery, Alcoholics Anonymous(AA) is a the place for recovery.” Moreover, there are those who feel treatments centers are just out to make money off information and techniques sufferers can get for free from AA. With that said, I personally am grateful for treatment centers. In my experience, they are helpful in getting a start on learning about the disease of alcoholism and the tools needed to build a long-term recovery program. However, to achieve long-term sobriety and a happy and joyful life, an alcoholic must work some type of ongoing recovery program which is what we’ll look at next.

 

Recovery Program

A strong recovery program consists of an on-going process, if maintained, will lead the alcoholic to a productive, joyful, and happy life. And most important of all, sober! In my experience, AA has been the only recovery program that has worked, for me. Abstinence is not recovery. Not in my opinion. Just because I stop drinking, all my problems do not go away. Many times they get worse. After all, they say you’ll feel better if you stop drinking. Yes, you’ll feel everything better including fear, anger, resentment, sadness, etc.. A saying often heard around recovery is “sober up a horse thief, and you’ve still got a horse thief.” It is necessary to deal with the underlying factors that contributed to ones drinking. That is where a 12 step program comes into play.

 

Most people are familiar with The Twelve Step Program of Alcoholics Anonymous. The program is designed to help the alcoholic develop a spiritual life, ego deflation, deal with their past, move on into their future, and is considered a design for living based on a set of spiritual principles. From the book, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, “A.A.’s Twelve Steps are a group of principles, spiritual in their nature, which, if practiced as a way of life, can expel the obsession to drink and enable the sufferer to become happily and usefully whole.” For me, this has been true.

 

Before any alcoholic can recover, they first must admit they need help and start moving out of denial. One of the things that kept me in denial for so long, was I refused to believe I had any emotional issues. I drank simply because I liked it, I had nothing better to do, or it was fun. But at some point it stopped becoming fun, even though I continued to convince myself otherwise. It wasn’t until I actually worked a recovery program did I realize there were things, emotional things, I needed to work on. I accepted the fact I needed help and from that point on I was in recovery. Today I insist on being in the solution and not in the problem.

Resource

Intensive Outpatient Program | Partial Hospitalization Program

Why Choosing The Right Aftercare Program Is Vital

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-0OPrAKPLM

There are countless different avenues one can explore to deal with a drug or alcohol addiction. People often choose to enter a residential rehabilitation center to deal with their addiction problems. There, they can receive the counseling and supervision they desperately need to get off of drugs or alcohol. They can also get their bodies detoxified in these facilities. Partial hospitalization is also becoming a more common route recovering addicts are taking. In that type of setting a recovering addict can get the constant supervision they need to help to get them off of drugs and alcohol for good.

Important Decision

For any addict, there may be no more important step in their recovery than choosing a rehabilitation center. There are many things to be considered when choosing what type of setting to enter into. It is critical to remember it is not like picking a hotel you are going on vacation to. Rehabilitation is very serious business and needs to be treated as such. They only way someone can recover from a drug or alcohol addiction is to find a treatment program that is conducive with their lives. That way they put themselves in the best possible position to get over their addictions.

Outpatient Options

For some, an intensive outpatient program may be a good match for their unique recovery needs. In this type of environment, people only have to attend a few times a week and can continue to meet their job or family responsibilities at home. However, this type of treatment is not recommended for individuals who are not very far along in the recovery process. If you are well into a recovery from addiction, however, this could be a good option for you to explore. Even though you do not live at these facilities, they maintain strict rules and guidelines that must be followed.

Continued Care

Another good option for recovering addicts is to enter a partial hospitalization center. There, they will be able to get the continued care they need while still being able to go home at night to see loved ones. This is another type of treatment that is only recommended for those who are far along on their path to sobriety. Otherwise, there may be too many chances for someone who has just admitted to an addiction to get distracted. As with all types of treatment centers, a person’s chances of success are much greater if they full commit to the program and adhere to all of the principles they are trying to instill.

Proper Aftercare

Regardless of what type of primary care center an addict chooses, maintaining aftercare once they have completed a program is essential in keeping people of drugs and alcohol. Without proper aftercare, it would be far too easy for a recovering addict to slip back into an addiction to drugs or alcohol. Aftercare provides individuals with the right channels to help them maintain their fragile sobriety. It is an invaluable part of treatment that should be taken just as seriously as any other component of recovery.

Resource

Exposure and Response Prevention | Intensive Outpatient Program

10 Tips To Reduce Your Exposure And Prevent Identity Theft

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Shbirr4lyE

Identity theft is the country’s fastest-growing financial crime. The Federal Trade Commission estimates that 27.3 million Americans have been victims of identity theft in the past 5 years, including 9.9 million people last year alone. Some ways to prevent becoming a victim could include avoid using credit cards or debit cards, stop filling out more credit applications, and cancel all of your credit cards. But the fact is that most exposure to identity theft is beyond your control, because there is still enough information about you and your finances floating around out there for identity thieves to put their hands on. Here are some tips to reduce your exposure and prevent identity theft:

 

 

1 – Make It As Difficult As Possible For The Thief.

 

Most Identity thieves aren’t dedicated, but opportunistic creatures. If they come across any difficulty in getting your information, they will move on to the next potential victim. Keep your documents under lock and key. Don’t make it easy for a repairman or a guest in your house to walk off with your checkbook or some of your important files. Don’t fool yourself, you don’t have to be rich or have a high credit score to have your identity stolen. Some identity thieves say that middle-class folks make the best targets, because they pay less attention to their finances than wealthy individuals.

 

2- Monitor Your Credit Report Constantly.

 

The first hint that you might have become a victim is a suspicious entry on your credit report. Experts recommend that you review your credit report twice a year or more.

 

3 – Buy a Paper Shredder.

 

Papers and documents that include personal financial information or your social security number must be shredded before is sent to the trash.

 

4 – Ask About Business Shredding Policies.

 

When required to give personal financial information, ask if the business has a shredding policy in place. Financial institutions, tax preparers, and companies with medical information should all be able to shred copies of your documents or have you come and pick them up, so you can do it yourself.

 

5 – Don’t Give Out Your Social Security Number.

 

Only Employers, IRS, DMV, Social Security Administration and certain Financial Institutions and Insurers that use your SSN to run credit checks to determine your premiums should be allowed to have this nine-digit number. When asked for your SSN as proof that you are who you say you are, give them only the last four digits.

 

6 – Protect Your Incoming and Outgoing Mail.

 

Get a Locking Mailbox. Many identity thieves simply follow the mail man around and grab what they can from unprotected mailboxes. Consider using the nearest post office to send all your mail, rather than leaving it out where anyone can take it. Or sign up for a secure online bill-paying service.

 

7 – Always Keep an Eye on Your Debit Card.

 

Just like a credit card, your ATM card can be used without punching in a personal identification number. The banks won’t hold you responsible for fraud using VISA or MasterCard logo cards but a thief can quickly empty your bank account and could be days until the bank can restore the stolen cash. Use a credit card when paying a restaurant bill or anywhere you won’t be able to monitor the actual transaction.

 

8 – Be Wary of Phone Solicitors and E-mails.

 

Don’t give out sensitive information by phone or email to requests purporting to be from financial institutions, unless you initiated contact or really thrust the institution. Criminals are using a technique called “phishing,” which uses an email claiming to be from your Bank and that redirects you to a look-alike website where you are asked to input your account numbers. When contacted this way, do not reply to the email and only call the Bank’s 1-800 number from your statement for communication.

 

9 – Monitor Your Social Security Statements.

 

Make sure you are being credited for all the taxes you have paid into the system. Missing earnings or earnings that are not yours can be an indication of fraud. Call the SSA at 1-800-772-1213 if there are any discrepancies.

 

10 – Carry Only the Necessary in Your Wallet.

 

Do not carry your Social Security Number in your wallet and only a few credit and debit cards should be in it. In case you have your wallet stolen, grab your cell or the nearest phone immediately and call to cancel your most important credit cards such as 1-800-VISA911 and 1-800-MASTERCARD. Also, make a photocopy of all your cards and your driver’s license. This will make it easier to report the thefts and get them replaced.

Resource

Partial Hospitalization Program | Exposure and Response Prevention

Intensive Outpatient Programs That Offer Withdrawal Treatment – From Your Home

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omdZkKrII1A

Benzodiazepine is a drug that has multiple uses as sedatives and as a muscle relaxant. Due to its anti-convulsant and amnesic properties, it is used for treatment of sleeping disorders and anxiety. Often people use it continuously and develop addiction to this drug that accounts to many disorders. After prolonged usage if someone tries to stop the usage of these drugs then it leads to certain withdrawal symptoms that may affect human health adversely. We have developed online programs and courses for those people, who need help and expert assistance. Benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms are similar to alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Benzodiazepines withdrawal in several cases has provoked life-threatening withdrawal symptoms such as seizures. Due to the increasing cases of these syndromes, we decided to design a unique program that will help people who are dealing with withdrawal symptoms take a new step towards life. Our online course can teach you the better part of life that you have missed until this moment. Once you gain enough knowledge about Benzodiazepine withdrawal and its symptoms things will become easier for you. Our online course focuses on all aspects of life that one can notice before and after this therapy.

 

We understand it is difficult for family, friends and even doctors to find a perfect way of withdrawal from benzodiazepines. Not even immense care or therapies can prepare them for the physical and psychological symptoms. In these situations, one needs an expert who can understand and suggest the appropriate therapy program. We have a dedicated team of experienced experts who are ready to assist you in deep trouble situations. We have designed keeping in mind the physical barriers that keep you away from treatments and technicality of the medical terms. You can notice the simplicity of the pattern and language used in the drug withdrawal programs.

Resource

Intensive Outpatient Program | Partial Hospitalization Program